Listing Type: Building

St Ninian’s Old Kirk Tower, Stirling

The largest surviving part of the church destroyed by the explosion of the Jacobite army's gunpowder on 1 February 1746 - probably as a result of an accident during the chaotic evacuation of the town.

Access

Exterior visible at all times from the adjacent graveyard.

Area of interest
1745

Wade’s Bridge, Aberfeldy

Designed by William Adam to carry the military road north, this key crossing of the River Tay was built in 1733 under the supervision of Lt-General George Wade. During the 1745 rising it was used by Government and Jacobite armies.

Access

Public access at all times. Care needed on the bridge itself as the footway is very narrow and traffic usually heavy.

Area of interest
1745

Salutation Hotel, Perth

There has been an inn on this site since 1699. One of the stories of the the origin of the name 'Salutation Inn' is that it comes from the meeting of John Burt (the proprietor) and the shaking of hands between himself and Prince Charles Edward. It is said that the Prince did not sleep at the inn but used it for meetings. The link is recorded on an external plaque on the distinctive early 19th century façade - this implies that the name was already in use at the time of the Prince's arrival.

Access

Plaque on street frontage accessible at all times.

Website

https://strathmorehotels-thesalutation.com/hotel-history/

Contact

tel: 01738 630066

Wrights Hall, Watergate, Perth

This 18th century building, on what was once the most important street in Perth, was the meeting place of the Wrights Incorporation. During the '45 it was used as a hospital. Provost James Cree, who lived on the top floor of the building was taken hostage by the Jacobite forces as surety for the payment of money by the town. One of the doorways has the date '1725' above it. The building interior has been completely gutted and rebuilt.

Access

A private building. No access to the interior.

Area of interest
1745

Nantes – Quayside of La Fosse (Quai de la Fosse)

The “Quai de la Fosse”, also known as the “Quai des Irlandais”, is located on the north bank of the Loire at the entrance to the city of Nantes. This was the quarter which, in the 18th century, was the home to the Irish merchants and shipowners. Claude Durbé, who commanded the frigate the Du Teillay and took Prince Charles Stuart to Scotland in July 1745, built his own property in 1756 at 86, Quai de la Fosse3 in the typical period Rococo style of Louis XV. The Du Teillay sailed down the Loire to Saint-Nazaire at the end of June 1745 when Prince Charles Edward Stuart embarked with his companions, the men later known as the seven men of Moidart. The Prince was also accompanied by Antoine Walsh, the owner of the ship. The Du Teillay set sail bound for Belle-Ile from the bay of Bonne Anse located just west of Saint-Nazaire on 3 July 1745 (New Style = N.S.). This little three-masted frigate referred to as a sloop was loaded with gold, arms, ammunition and supplies for Scotland. Antoine Walsh was a fervent Nantes Jacobite and merchant who had accumulated a colossal fortune, having been first a Corsair captain for king Louis XV. He became a successful shipowner and embarked in the infamous slave trade between Nantes, the west coast of Africa and Saint-Domingue, also known as the Triangular trade. As a shrewd entrepreneur and avid investor, Antoine Walsh bought sugar cane plantations in Saint-Domingue from which he drew a large part of his financial success. The “Quai de la Fosse” now hosts the memorial to the abolition of slavery and provides a pontoon to a splendid three-masted ship, a ship known on the banks of the Loire named Le Bélem (https: // www.fondationbelem.com), a vessel that reminds the past of the city of Nantes in the maritime trade.


3 The property is still known as Hôtel Durbé.

Access

Street parking, payment car park (parking Gloriette-Petite Hollande).

Website

https://memorial.nantes.fr/

Belle-Ile-en-mer – Port of Le Palais and bay of Ramonette

The Du Teillay with Prince Charles Stuart on board sailed throughout the night of 4 July 1745 (N.S.) to finally lay anchor in the bay just south-east off the fortified port of Le Palais in Belle-Ile, most probably by the beach of Ramonette located a mile east. The Prince had to wait on board the Du Teillay until 13 July 1745 for the arrival of her escort, L’Elisabeth, a vessel of the line of 64 guns built in Brest in 1722 and loaded with more than 500 men of infantry and crew on board. The two ships did not leave Belle-Ile for the south-west coast of Brittany until 15 July 1745 (N.S.). It is said that, during the ten days in Belle-Ile the Prince occupied his free time by learning the art of sea fishing.

Much later, the aide-de-camp to Lord George Murray, Colonel Richard Warren who organised the successful rescue of Prince Charles Edward Stuart in September 1746 on board L’Heureux was also given the command of Belle-Ile. As a reward for his efforts, Richard Warren was made Baron by King Louis XV before he became commander of Belle-Isle after the seven-year war.

Access

Free car park. Follow the coastal path from the parking at Rue des Remparts through the gate below the city wall to Porte of Locmaria then follow the path to the beach of Ramonette. The path provides an excellent view to the bay.

Website

https://www.belle-ile.com

Contact

www.belle-ile.com/belle-ile/contact. Tel: +33 (0)2 97 31 81 93

Paimboeuf – Port and Quayside

The small port of Paimboeuf is located some ten miles inland on the south bank of the river Loire. It was the avant-port of Nantes in the 18th century for ships of more than 200 tons that could not sail up to Nantes because the accumulation of sand in the river prevented larger ships from sailing further upstream. In March 1746, two frigates, Le Mars and La Bellone, were sent from Paimboeuf to mount a desperate rescue mission for the Jacobite army by providing a large amount of gold, weapons, ammunition, and brandy for Charles Stuart and his forces and, in case all hope was lost, locate, and bring the Prince back to Brittany. Whilst the Prince could not be found, the two ships faced three of the Royal in a sea battle at Loch Nan Uamh on 3 May 1746 (Old Style = O.S.). Le Mars, heavily damaged, and La Bellone – on board which a fever broke out, returned together to Paimboeuf on 7 June 1746 (N.S.) - with Lord Echo and Lord George Drummond safely on board Le Mars. Sir Thomas Sheridan travelled on La Bellone on board which a fever broke out during the return voyage. The hospital in Paimboeuf probably treated sick members of the crew.

Access

Free parking.

Website

https://en.saint-brevin.com

Contact

Visitor centre of Paimboeuf (quai Sadi Carnot). Tel: 00 33 (2) 40 27 53 82

Saint-Brévin-Les Pins – Port of Mindin

The anchorage point located east of the head of Mindin was the starting point of the Du Teillay in the morning of 2 July 1745 (N.S.), according to the log of Captain Claude Durbé. The light frigate or sloop was to take Prince Charles Edward Stuart to the bay of Bonne Anse located a few miles west of Saint-Nazaire and embark Prince Charles Edward Stuart on the evening of 2 July to take him to Belle-Ile, then the west of Scotland for the start of the Jacobite uprising. West of the anchorage located at the foot of the river bridge is also the location of an ancient fort dating to 1861 that now hosts the Maritime Museum of the River Loire, a museum dedicated to the history of the navigation on the river. This location provides some pleasant beach walks along the south bank of the river Loire with some interesting views on the shipyards of Saint-Nazaire on the north bank of the Estuary.

Access

Free parking. Museum opening hours.

Website

https://museemarinemindin.com

Contact

https://museemarinemindin.com/contact/. Tel: 00 33 2 40 27 00 64.

Saint-Malo – the Corsair City and Port

The city of Saint-Malo on the north coast of Brittany was the home of famous Corsair captains in the 17th and 18th century acting in the name of the king of France. Saint-Malo provided ships, crew, and support to the Jacobite uprising through Antoine Walsh, born in Saint-Malo and owner of the Du Teillay, son of Philip Walsh of Ballynacooly who brought king James II of England and James VII of Scotland back to France from Kinsale, Ireland after the battle of the Boyne in 1690. In Saint-Malo, the Jacobites received support from Richard Butler, brother-in-law of Antoine Walsh who stepped in 1746 to provide colonel Richard Warren with two ships, Le Prince de Conti and L’Heureux for the rescue of Prince Charles Stuart in September 1746. The expedition was a total success with the return of Prince Charles Stuart to Roscoff on the 10 October 1746 (N.S.) accompanied by many of his loyal partisans.

Access

Car park

Website

https://www.saint-malo-tourisme.co.uk

Contact

+33 (0) 825 13 52 00