Listing Region: Highlands & Islands

Littleferry Battlefield

On 15 April 1746 a force of 400-500 Jacobites that had attempted to retrieve captured supplies was attacked by two Independent Highland Companies from the pro-Government Clan Sutherland and Clan Mackay. Most of the Jacobite officers were captured; many of the men were killed, and the rest were driven onto the beach, where several were drowned in Loch Fleet. The defeat prevented the Jacobites receiving valuable reinforcements before the Battle at Culloden the next day(although they may have been late in any case). Also known as the 'Skirmish at Golspie'.

Access

Access at all times.

Dunstaffnage Castle

One of Scotland's oldest stone castles. It housed Government troops during the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite risings. Late in 1746, Flora MacDonald was arrested for assisting the escape of Prince Charles Edward and brought to Dunstaffnage. She remained there for just a few days, before being moved to the Tower of London. She was released the following year. The castle is now in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

Access

Opening hours. Admission charge. Free to HS members.

Website

https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/dunstaffnage-castle-and-chapel/overview/

Contact

Phone: 01631 562 465

Flora MacDonald Statue, Inverness

The Scottish heroine who helped Prince Charles Edward escape is depicted with a Scottish hound at her feet, looking out over the valley and shielding her eyes. The statue was designed by Andrew Davidson, a sculptor from Inverness and installed on the terrace in front of Inverness Castle in 1899.

Access

Accessible at all times.

Eilean Donan Castle

The ancient castle was garrisoned by Government troops in 1715 but retaken by the Jacobites before the battle of Sheriffmuir. In 1719 the Jacobite garrison was subjected to a three day naval bombardment and then demolition that left the castle derelict for two hundred years . A twenty-year rebuilding project was completed in 1932.

Access

Opening hours (seasonal). Admission charge. Parking, shop, café.

Website

https://www.eileandonancastle.com/

Contact

email: info@eileandonancastle.com
Tel: 01599 555202
Fax: 01599 555262

Area of interest
1715 1719

Corgarff Castle

This medieval tower house was burnt by the Jacobites in 1689 and 1690. In 1746, after Culloden, it was refitted and refortified as a barracks for a Government garrison of about fifty.

Access

Opening hours (seasonal). Admission charge. Free to HS members. Please note that access may be restricted by building/conservation works. Free to view from grounds.

Website

https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/corgarff-castle/

Contact

Phone: 01975 651 460

Area of interest
1689 1745

Clan Cameron Museum

The Camerons have lived in Lochaber since the 14th century. Achnacarry House is the seat of the Clan Cameron and home of Cameron of Lochiel. The Museum in the grounds of the house traces the history of the Clan from through 27 generations to the present day, The Camerons were staunchly Jacobite, coming out in all four Jacobite risings, in 1689, 1715, 1719 and 1745, so the displays have an extensive section on Bonnie Prince Charlie and the risings. In the grounds is the row of trees that Donald Cameron of Lochiel was planting when the messenger from Prince Charles Edward arrived in August 1745.

Access

Opening hours (seasonal). Admission charge. Parking.

Website

https://www.clancameronmuseum.co.uk/

Contact

email: curator@clancameronmuseum.co.uk

Phone: +44 (0)1397 712090

Clan Donnachaidh Museum

Clan Donnachaidh (the 'Children of Duncan'), made up of Robertsons, Duncans, Reids and other surnames, is closely associated with an area stretching from Rannoch in the west of Perthshire to the border with Angus in the east. It played an important part in in the 1689, 1715 and 1745 Jacobite risings. The museum contains Jacobite items and gives an overview of clan history. Jacobite exhibits include the sword, pistol and sporran of Donald Robertson of Woodsheal, who led the clan into battle on behalf of his cousin, the aged Chief, Alexander Robertson of Struan, who took part in all three Jacobite rebellions. There is also the travelling fiddle of Sir John Cope, the commander of the defeated government troops at the Battle of Prestonpans, which was found in his coach after the battle. The coach and all its contents were given to Struan, who returned home in it.

Access

Opening hours. Admission free.

Website

http://www.donnachaidh.com

Contact

Tel: 01796 483770
email: admin@donnachaidh.com

Ruthven Barracks

On the site of an earlier castle severely damaged by the Jacobites in 1689. Built by George II’s government after the failed Jacobite uprising of 1715 and completed in the 1720s. The troops stationed there were to maintain law and order and enforce the Disarming Act of 1716. The barracks saw action twice. 300 Jacobites failed to take the barracks in 1745, but a more heavily-armed attack in February 1746 forced the barracks’ surrender. The Jacobites rallied here after their defeat at Culloden before dispersing. The buildings were destroyed either in the February attack or after Culloden. The site is in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

Access

Free access. Open all year.

Website

https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/ruthven-barracks/

Contact

General enquiries phone: 0131 668 8600

Glencoe

This beautiful glen is the site of the infamous massacre of 13 February 1692. Soldiers of the Earl of Argyll's Regiment turned on their MacDonald hosts in an action designed to set an example to others who were slow to swear the Oath of Allegiance to the new monarchs William and Mary. Betraying the hospitality they received while billeted in the glen, the troops murdered about 30 of their hosts though many others escaped.

Access

Accessible at all times. The Glencoe Folk Museum is open seasonally and has an admission charge.

Area of interest
1689 Clans